It’s important for consumers to understand whether a real estate agent represents the buyer, the seller, or both parties; obviously, the agent’s loyalty can greatly affect several details of the transaction, including the final price. State laws regulate whether an agent can represent both parties in a real estate transaction, technically known as “dual agency.” Agents must disclose their representation, so that buyers and sellers are aware of any conflicts of interest.
Do you know how to calculate the fair market value of a house? What about the capitalization rate or real estate conversion? Do you know what is the right type of appraisal for the house? The situs definition, as well as the replacement cost or income approach, may seem foreign to you. Moreover, as a real estate investor, do you know how to convert a warehouse into a loft? Or what novation in real estate means? Real estate agents are like copilots - they help home buyers, sellers and renters navigate through all the real estate documents they need to sign explaining all the unfamiliar real estate terms. And business gets a lot more complex as we dive into commercial real estate.
The exact definitions of and distinctions between a real estate agent and a real estate broker vary among states. Generally, however, anyone who earns a basic real estate license (which involves taking a certain number of accredited courses and passing an exam) can be called a real estate agent. A real estate agent is essentially a salesperson, qualified to help consumers buy or sell a property.
Revisit your state real estate commission's website for instructions on how to sign up to take the licensing exam. (Most states outsource administration of the exams to third-party testing centers.) Exams are typically divided into two portions: one on federal real estate laws and general real estate principles, the second on state-specific laws. Both typically consist of 60 to 100 multiple-choice questions, including math questions that require you to use a calculator (e.g., prorating taxes for a specific property). Most pre-licensing courses provide students with sample tests, and many real estate commissions publish sample questions online.

A realtor is a member of the National Association of Realtors (NAR), a trade association. Both agents and brokers can be realtors, along with property managers, appraisers, and other real estate industry professionals. Realtors are expected to be experts in their field and must follow the NAR’s code of ethics, which requires agents to uphold specific duties to clients and customers, the public, and other realtors. In addition to NAR, realtors must belong to a state or local real estate association or board.
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Even if it's not your first rodeo; the real estate market is constantly changing, so don't underestimate the benefits of dealing with a real estate broker or agent who knows the area. Wouldn't you like to know what the real estate trends are to take advantage of, or the new housing market legislation that might affect the price and conditions of the house in the long run? What about the current market for rentals or even commercial real estate? There's no one better to advise you on that than the agents listed on The OFFICIAL Real Estate Agent Directory®.
States require people to take pre-licensing training from a certified institution before they can sit for the real estate licensing exam. The required number of training hours can vary significantly by jurisdiction: In Virginia, for example, real estate agents must take 60 hours of pre-licensing training, but in California they need to take 135 hours.
Pay for membership to the local multiple listing service. Membership in your local MLS is essential, since you must use the system to list properties, which are then dispersed to websites like realtor.com®. The service also enables you to easily pull a property's tax information, analyze market trends, and see listings before they go on the market. Costs vary greatly: Membership for Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, DC, agents to the Metropolitan Regional Information Systems, for example, costs $1,136 per year; while on the low end are areas like California's Southwest Riverside County, which charges MLS dues of $220 per year.
5. Agents perform tasks that take a lot of time, thus allowing their clients to focus on other things instead of wasting time trying to figure out how to do certain things on their own. Among the daily tasks are marketing the properties online or via the multiple listing services (MLS), scheduling showings, planning an open house, keeping in touch with the buyers/sellers/landlords, formulating offers, and so on.
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